Articles

wrist-controlled robotic device

NEW LEADER OF CENTER FOR BIOMECHANICAL ENGINEERING RESEARCH

Mechanical engineering Professor Liyun Wang is the sixth director of UD’s CBER

November 9, 2017 | Liyun Wang, a professor of mechanical engineering, has been named director of the University of Delaware Center for Biomechanical Engineering Research (CBER), a research center that develops engineering science and clinical technology to reduce the impact of diseases like osteoarthritis, osteoporosis, degenerated discs, and cystic fibrosis on people. 

wrist-controlled robotic device

ROBOT REHAB

Biomed engineering professor receives American Heart Association grant to study robot-aided stroke rehabilitation

September 25, 2017 | About every 40 seconds, someone in the United States has a stroke. Many stroke survivors have lingering brain damage that makes motor tasks, such as grasping objects, difficult. Everyone heals at a different pace, and ideally, treatment would be patient-specific and patient-adaptive.

Johnna Temenoff

BIOMECHANICS RESEARCH SYMPOSIUM

14th annual event features keynote, ongoing research in biomechanics

May 25, 2017 | More than 100 people turned out for the 14th annual Biomechanics Research Symposium at the University of Delaware STAR Campus on Friday, May 12. The event was hosted by the Center for Biomechanical Engineering Research, the Department of Mechanical Engineering and the Delaware Rehabilitation Institute.

UD researchers (from left) Fabrizio Sergi, Darcy Reisman and Jill Higginson monitor a student's gait.

GOALL!

NSF grant supports new approach to gait training for stroke survivors

October 19, 2016 | Thirty percent of stroke survivors, including some 300,000 Americans every year, are left with compromised walking ability. As our population ages, these numbers will undoubtedly grow, increasing the already high demand for technology to support gait training.

Christopher Price

JOINT FUNCTION

NSF grant supports research to shed light on how cartilage works

October 17, 2016 | Cartilage, a connective tissue found throughout the body, is critical to the function of our joints. Tough yet flexible, it supports load and enables frictionless motion between joint surfaces.

Tom Buchanan

HEALTHY KNEES

NIH grant supports investigation of connection between ACL surgery and osteoarthritis

October 13, 2016 | Thirty percent of stroke survivors, including some 300,000 Americans every year, are left with compromised walking ability. As our population ages, these numbers will undoubtedly grow, increasing the already high demand for technology to support gait training.

Research Experiences for Undergrads

RESEARCH EXPERIENCES FOR UNDERGRADS

NSF-funded program supports diverse group of undergraduates in biomechanical engineering

August 15, 2016 | Even accomplished researchers know that luck can play a role in scientific breakthroughs.

That was one important message shared by Babatunde A. Ogunnaike, dean of the College of Engineering at the University of Delaware, in a special seminar for undergraduate researchers on July 5.

Jill Higginson (center) during a presentation at the Health Sciences Complex

CBER Day

Center for Biomechanical Engineering Research welcomes high school students

Apr. 15, 2016 | Close to 100 middle and high school students visited the Health Sciences Complex at the University of Delaware on National Biomechanics Day, April 7, joining their peers across the country in a nationwide “Biomechanics Open House.”

The open house was held in conjunction with CBER Day, an annual event at UD that showcases work done by faculty and students in the Center for Biomechanical Engineering Research.

Liyun Wang with research colleagues Xin Lu and Catherine Kim-Safran

Better bone health

NIH grant to support continuing research on exercise and bone quality

Aug. 5, 2015 | More than 50 million Americans have osteoporosis, which is responsible for two million broken bones and $19 billion in related costs every year.

Exercise is one of the best defenses against low bone mass, but it’s not an equal-opportunity improver — different people and different bones respond differently to the mechanical stimulus provided by various forms of exercise.